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Robin Hood Primary School

Aiming High to Excel and Exceed

Foundation 1 (Nursery)

Nursery (Foundation 1)

Areas of learning 

 

Our stimulating Nursery environment is set up with lots of areas of continuous provision around our large, spacious environment. Effective continuous provision is designed to offer children a constant environment that is safe for them to explore whilst challenging their learning using different resources available to them.  Children are given the opportunity to become independent in their choice making and given the freedom to explore, challenge and take control of their learning.

 

The EYFS (Early Years Foundation Stage) is important in supporting children in becoming active learners. Continuous provision are toys and objects that are set up constantly and consistently in the environment and this enables children to develop their thinking skills and develop their story telling skills through play. Practitioners observe play closely through photographs and written observations and the use of continuous provision and play based skills during the session.

 Continuous provision supports children’s learning and development across all seven areas and the characteristics of effective learning. 

Below are some of the areas of continuous provision that you will find in the Nursery at Robin Hood.

Sand Area

Sand Area

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The Sand Play provision supports physical development - both fine and gross motor skills and hand eye coordination. Children pour, dig, scoop, sift, build using the sand and learn cleaning up skills when using the dustpan and brush. Hand-eye coordination and small muscle control improve as children learn to manipulate sand accessories to build castles and use moulds to make shapes.

Sand play also promotes social skills.  When children work together at the Sand Area they are faced with real problems that require sharing, compromising, and negotiating. As children take on roles associated with their early role play, they learn important social skills such as empathy and perspective, listening to each other and finding solutions themselves without an adult intervention. 

Mathematical and scientific concepts can be developed during sand play by providing children with containers in a variety of sizes and shapes, balance scales, or counting bears and spoons and equipment of different sizes and capacities.  

 

Look out for future mathematicians and scientists exploring the Sand Area!

Water Area

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Water Area

Gross motor skills

Fine motor skills

Communication 

Problem solving 

Sharing 

Math concepts

Negotiating 

Role play and story telling 

 

Water play provides children opportunities to experiment and explore scientific and mathematical concepts, develop language, enhance fine and gross motor skills and hand eye communication. Children also have opportunity to continue to develop social and turn taking skills. 

Children are exposed to water play materials and begin to understand why and how things happen, for example floating and sinking experiments and mathematical concepts of more/less, empty/full, greater than/less than and counting skills. 

Sensory experiences are explored through the different textures that are found in the water area - smooth, rough, slimy, squishy and different temperatures with warm or cold water. Motor skills are developed through pouring and swooshing water in pipes or containers, and

 hand eye coordination. Water play can be very calming to children and can be a very relaxing experience, swishing the water or listening to the sound of pouring water and can relieve tension in children.

Turn taking, problem solving and negotiating equipment are all important skills and experiences that happen around the water tray and these important skills can then be transferred into different areas of the setting. Children have to play cooperatively sharing space and equipment to reach a common goal. 

New vocabulary is used in a purposeful environment in regards to the equipment used and adjectives to describe the water - bubbly, warm, cold, splash, splosh! Water Play can also be used to extend role play experiences such as washing babies or baby clothes or adding a tea set to enhance the water provision.

Role Play Area

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                                       Role Play Area

Story telling 

Knowledge and understanding of the world 

Communication

Social skills

Confidence building

Friendship making 

 

Role play is always a busy and popular area of the Nursery as it allows children to develop and practise their communication, confidence and creativity skills. It’s a fun place to be where children can get into character - both in the kitchen area or using one of the exciting and popular costumes. Ion our Role Play Area everyone is welcome and we are more than happy to make anyone lunch or a cup of tea using our role play kitchen equipment and food.

We have recently added pets and baby dolls to our kitchen to extend our play and to allow the children to demonstrate their care and concern skills for everything.

                                         Creative Area

Knowledge and understanding of the world 

Communication

Social skills

Confidence building

Friendship making 

Joining skills 

Problem solving skills 

 

The Creative Area allows children to develop their cutting and making skills both through independent and adult supported activities. Children are given opportunity to create, make and design their own projects and explore the design process from independent thought to finished outcome. Problem solving skills are demonstrated through trial and error during the design process and children independently think and reflect on their work and improve where they see necessary. 

Using resources in the Creative Area allows children to share and turn take with the resources and equipment and often independently make artwork for their friends to take home. Children are given opportunity to talk about what they have made and develop confidence and language skills during these conversations

                                         Painting Area

Social skills

Turn taking

Mark making

Reflection 

Expression 

Problem solving 

Scientific exploration 

Fine motor

Gross motor

 

The learning opportunities which take place in the Painting Area include the sharing and the turn taking of the equipment and resources in the Painting Area. Mark making and both gross and fine motor skills are developed during the process of art. Children use art and the use of paint to create and express themselves both moods and feelings can be demonstrated using brushstrokes on the page. 

Panting and art as a process allows children to explore and experiment with colours, forms and textures in order to create a pieces of work in which they feel a sense of pride and confidence in.  

 

Small World Play

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                                     Small World Area

Story telling 

Confidence

Social skills

Friendships 

Knowledge and understanding of the world

Speaking

Role play 

Turn taking 

 

The role play story telling elements of small world make it an exciting and interesting area of the classroom to learn. Children are able to create their own stories using figures and resources and often create a running commentary on their play. Children have the opportunity to play both along side and cooperatively with other children as this is a very popular area of the classroom. 

Children practise their sharing and turn taking naturally within small world and have to resolve any conflicts or problems which may arise during play. New topic related worlds and vocabulary can be introduced during small world play in order to extend children’s vocabulary. 

Number and Shapes

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                                        Maths Area

 

The malleable properties of play dough make it fun for investigation and exploration as well as secretly building up strength in all the tiny hand muscles and tendons, making them ready for pencil and scissor control later on. 

As part of simple, tactile play it can be squashed, squeezed, rolled, flattened, chopped, cut, scored, raked, punctured, poked and shredded! Each one of these different actions aids fine motor development in a different way, not to mention hand-eye co ordination and general concentration. And as soon as you add another element to it, like essences, natural materials, colouring etc. the list of benefits and creative play possibilities continues to grow!  

We make our hands and fingers really strong in the Play dough Area!

                                         Reading Area

Story telling

New vocabulary

Imaginative play

Social skills

Listen ting and attention skills

Reading 

Writing 

 

The Reading Area is a comfortable area In which children have access to stories and puppet characters who have previously been shared in the setting. Children are encouraged to retell stories to friends and use pictures in the books to remind themselves of key characters and events in the story. 

Children are given the opportunity to handle books and understand how we take care of books and how we hold them the right way round and turn the pages carefully. Stories which children are able to orally retell influence and can be used in their small world and independent narrative play.

                                      Play dough Area

Fine motor 

Social skills 

Turn taking

Creative skills

Story telling

Sharia 

Imaginative play

 

The Playdough Area is another area which is incredibly popular and which is an ideal place for children to develop conflict resolution and turn taking during the session. Children develop strength and dexterity in their fingers and joints in preparation for scissor skills and pencil control. 

It is a sensory and exploratory experience for children who can mould, squash, squish, roll and sculpt with the soft dough. Hand eye coordination is developed and improved and general concentration and attention skills are increased.

                                     Mark-making Area

Fine Motor

Writing skills

Social skills

Confidence

Communication 

 

The Mark Making Area is designed to encourage and promote early writing and Mark making of different levels of control. Children are encouraged to shadow write over the letters in their name and practise pencil control sheets in straight lines and wavy lines. Children are encouraged to Mark make with purpose for example - writing their name or writing the name of who their work is for. Children are also encourage to talk about what they have written and to tell more details about their work to encourage communication and language. 

                                    Construction Area

Imaginative play

Problem solving 

Social skills

Turn taking

Knowledge and understanding of the world

Story telling 

Communication 

Collaboration 

Team work

 

The Construction Area is an ideal area for children to apply and develop their mathematical knowledge in regards to the use of shapes appropriately for tasks. Children are encouraged to add stories and narratives to their buildings and constructions in order to enhance language and story telling skills. 

Problem solving and negotiating skills are demonstrated and observed when friends collaborate together on joint project pride and confidence is shown in its success. Leadership skills can often be observed in this area as children encourage others to help them achieve and end goal.